TALK: THE AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINALS AND THE ARTWORK OF THE BAUDIN EXPEDITION


Join us for this fascinating discussion where Emeritus Professor Margaret Sankey will uncover the imagery created of the Australian Indigenous population during the early days of European exploration. 

The French scientific expedition, commissioned by Bonaparte and captained by Nicolas Baudin, left Le Havre in October 1800 in the Géographe and the Naturaliste. There were 22 scientists on board and their main brief was to collect zoological, botanical and geological specimens and to map the coastlines of New Holland (Australia). The scientists also received instructions to study the aboriginal inhabitants and both to collect information about their way of life, and to make drawings of them as data for the emerging science of anthropology. The drawings executed by the artists of the expedition, Charles-Alexandre Lesueur and Nicolas-Martin Petit, are a precious record from that early period of the indigenous people of Van Diemen's land (Tasmania) and Sydney (Port Jackson).

Glass of wine included upon arrival.

MEET YOUR SPEAKER:


EMERITUS PROFESSOR MARGARET SANKEY

Margaret Sankey's research career in French Studies has been devoted to the study of the history of ideas and mentalités in France, with particular reference to the early modern period and the scientific revolution.

Margaret has published extensively in my key areas of interest: Cyrano de Bergerac’s novels and the transmission of his texts; French notions of Terra australis, in particular, research on the writing of Abbé Paulmier (1663-4), to the end of the eighteenth century; the Baudin Expedition to Australia (1800 to 1804). She has also edited and co-edited several books, and co-translated into English The Anthropological Structures of the Imaginary by Gilbert Durand. Her experience in the field of editing has led her to theorise on the nature of editing and to break new ground in the conceptualisation of the editorial process.